Class War on Wonga. / Chong, Derrick.

In: Journal of Visual Culture, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 236-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Class War on Wonga. / Chong, Derrick.

In: Journal of Visual Culture, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 236-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Chong, D 2015, 'Class War on Wonga', Journal of Visual Culture, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 236-242. https://doi.org/10.1177/1470412915592872

APA

Chong, D. (2015). Class War on Wonga. Journal of Visual Culture, 14(2), 236-242. https://doi.org/10.1177/1470412915592872

Vancouver

Chong D. Class War on Wonga. Journal of Visual Culture. 2015 Aug 1;14(2):236-242. https://doi.org/10.1177/1470412915592872

Author

Chong, Derrick. / Class War on Wonga. In: Journal of Visual Culture. 2015 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 236-242.

BibTeX

@article{6726c89e5b8b44fa9315552536881fbf,
title = "Class War on Wonga",
abstract = "UK activist group Class War{\textquoteright}s {\textquoteleft}WAR ON wonga{\textquoteright} campaign is viewed via Boltanski and Chiapello{\textquoteright}s (2005 [1999]) critique of capitalism, namely as a form of social critique. Wonga has emerged as UK{\textquoteright}s leading payday loan company since it was founded in 2007, and should be recognized as a product of the culture of financialization. Class War{\textquoteright}s campaign is a response to the linkage between inequality and entrepreneurial capitalism. As an example of entrepreneurial capitalism, the possibility of free enterprise, Wonga{\textquoteright}s self-description as an {\textquoteleft}innovative digital company{\textquoteright} makes directly wealthy the founding entrepreneurs and their current venture capital partners. Yet the economic success of Wonga also represents a growing inequality in a society of unprecedented wealth. Given the UK perspective, the long shadow of Thatcher informs the paper, as does the criminalization of debt during the Victorian period. ",
keywords = "Activist Practices, Boltanski and Chiapello , Capitalism, Class War, Financialization, Payday Lending, Venture Capital, Wonga",
author = "Derrick Chong",
year = "2015",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1470412915592872",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "236--242",
journal = "Journal of Visual Culture",
issn = "1470-4129",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Class War on Wonga

AU - Chong, Derrick

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - UK activist group Class War’s ‘WAR ON wonga’ campaign is viewed via Boltanski and Chiapello’s (2005 [1999]) critique of capitalism, namely as a form of social critique. Wonga has emerged as UK’s leading payday loan company since it was founded in 2007, and should be recognized as a product of the culture of financialization. Class War’s campaign is a response to the linkage between inequality and entrepreneurial capitalism. As an example of entrepreneurial capitalism, the possibility of free enterprise, Wonga’s self-description as an ‘innovative digital company’ makes directly wealthy the founding entrepreneurs and their current venture capital partners. Yet the economic success of Wonga also represents a growing inequality in a society of unprecedented wealth. Given the UK perspective, the long shadow of Thatcher informs the paper, as does the criminalization of debt during the Victorian period.

AB - UK activist group Class War’s ‘WAR ON wonga’ campaign is viewed via Boltanski and Chiapello’s (2005 [1999]) critique of capitalism, namely as a form of social critique. Wonga has emerged as UK’s leading payday loan company since it was founded in 2007, and should be recognized as a product of the culture of financialization. Class War’s campaign is a response to the linkage between inequality and entrepreneurial capitalism. As an example of entrepreneurial capitalism, the possibility of free enterprise, Wonga’s self-description as an ‘innovative digital company’ makes directly wealthy the founding entrepreneurs and their current venture capital partners. Yet the economic success of Wonga also represents a growing inequality in a society of unprecedented wealth. Given the UK perspective, the long shadow of Thatcher informs the paper, as does the criminalization of debt during the Victorian period.

KW - Activist Practices

KW - Boltanski and Chiapello

KW - Capitalism

KW - Class War

KW - Financialization

KW - Payday Lending

KW - Venture Capital

KW - Wonga

U2 - 10.1177/1470412915592872

DO - 10.1177/1470412915592872

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 236

EP - 242

JO - Journal of Visual Culture

JF - Journal of Visual Culture

SN - 1470-4129

IS - 2

ER -