Byzantines, Latins and Turks in the Eastern Mediterranean World after 1150. / Harris, Jonathan (Editor); Holmes, Catherine (Editor); Russell, Eugenia (Editor).

Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012. 378 p. (Oxford Studies in Byzantium).

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Published

Abstract

The late medieval eastern Mediterranean, before its incorporation into the Ottoman Empire in the sixteenth century, presents a complex and fragmented picture. The Ayyubid and Mamluk sultanates held sway over Egypt and Syria, Asia Minor was divided between a number of Turkish emirates, the Aegean between a host of small Latin states, and the Byzantine Empire was only a fragment of its former size. This collection of thirteen original articles, by both established and younger scholars, seeks to find common themes that unite this disparate world. Focusing on religious identity, cultural exchange, commercial networks, and the construction of political legitimacy among Christians and Muslims in the late Medieval eastern Mediterranean, they discuss and analyse the interaction between these religious cultures and trace processes of change and development within the individual societies. A detailed introduction provides a broad geopolitical context to the contributions and discusses at length the broad themes which unite the articles and which transcend traditional interpretations of the eastern Mediterranean in the later medieval period.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherOxford University Press
Number of pages378
ISBN (Print)9780199641888
Publication statusPublished - 29 Nov 2012

Publication series

NameOxford Studies in Byzantium
PublisherOxford University Press

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Research outputs

This open access research output is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

ID: 1432806