Bringing a Time–Depth Perspective to Collective Animal Behaviour. / Biro, Dora; Sasaki, Taka; Portugal, Steve.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 31, No. 7, 07.2016, p. 550–562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Bringing a Time–Depth Perspective to Collective Animal Behaviour. / Biro, Dora; Sasaki, Taka; Portugal, Steve.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 31, No. 7, 07.2016, p. 550–562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Biro, D, Sasaki, T & Portugal, S 2016, 'Bringing a Time–Depth Perspective to Collective Animal Behaviour', Trends in Ecology and Evolution, vol. 31, no. 7, pp. 550–562. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.03.018

APA

Vancouver

Author

Biro, Dora ; Sasaki, Taka ; Portugal, Steve. / Bringing a Time–Depth Perspective to Collective Animal Behaviour. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 550–562.

BibTeX

@article{1cb292485bd94ef288cf5d98df875239,
title = "Bringing a Time–Depth Perspective to Collective Animal Behaviour",
abstract = "The field of collective animal behaviour examines how relatively simple, local interactions between individuals in groups combine to produce global-level outcomes. Existing mathematical models and empirical work have identified candidate mechanisms for numerous collective phenomena, but have typically focused on one-off or short-term performance. We argue that feedback between collective performance and learning – giving the former the capacity to become an adaptive, and potentially cumulative, process – is a currently poorly explored, but crucial mechanism in understanding collective systems. We synthesise material ranging from swarm intelligence in social insects, through collective movements in vertebrates, to collective decision-making in animal and human groups, to propose avenues for future research to identify the potential for changes in these systems to accumulate over time. ",
author = "Dora Biro and Taka Sasaki and Steve Portugal",
year = "2016",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1016/j.tree.2016.03.018",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "550–562",
journal = "Trends in Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "0169-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "7",

}

RIS

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T1 - Bringing a Time–Depth Perspective to Collective Animal Behaviour

AU - Biro, Dora

AU - Sasaki, Taka

AU - Portugal, Steve

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - The field of collective animal behaviour examines how relatively simple, local interactions between individuals in groups combine to produce global-level outcomes. Existing mathematical models and empirical work have identified candidate mechanisms for numerous collective phenomena, but have typically focused on one-off or short-term performance. We argue that feedback between collective performance and learning – giving the former the capacity to become an adaptive, and potentially cumulative, process – is a currently poorly explored, but crucial mechanism in understanding collective systems. We synthesise material ranging from swarm intelligence in social insects, through collective movements in vertebrates, to collective decision-making in animal and human groups, to propose avenues for future research to identify the potential for changes in these systems to accumulate over time.

AB - The field of collective animal behaviour examines how relatively simple, local interactions between individuals in groups combine to produce global-level outcomes. Existing mathematical models and empirical work have identified candidate mechanisms for numerous collective phenomena, but have typically focused on one-off or short-term performance. We argue that feedback between collective performance and learning – giving the former the capacity to become an adaptive, and potentially cumulative, process – is a currently poorly explored, but crucial mechanism in understanding collective systems. We synthesise material ranging from swarm intelligence in social insects, through collective movements in vertebrates, to collective decision-making in animal and human groups, to propose avenues for future research to identify the potential for changes in these systems to accumulate over time.

U2 - 10.1016/j.tree.2016.03.018

DO - 10.1016/j.tree.2016.03.018

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 550

EP - 562

JO - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

JF - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

SN - 0169-5347

IS - 7

ER -