Brevis oratio penetrat celum : Proverbs, Prayers and Lay Understanding in Late Medieval England. / Bennett, Alastair.

In: New Medieval Literatures, Vol. 14, 2012, p. 127-163.

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Brevis oratio penetrat celum : Proverbs, Prayers and Lay Understanding in Late Medieval England. / Bennett, Alastair.

In: New Medieval Literatures, Vol. 14, 2012, p. 127-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{e67169bcfc0145b293bc1f3b81675dc0,
title = "Brevis oratio penetrat celum: Proverbs, Prayers and Lay Understanding in Late Medieval England",
abstract = "This article explores the different interpretations of the phrase {\textquoteleft}Brevis oratio penetrat celum{\textquoteright}, {\textquoteleft}A short prayer pierces heaven{\textquoteright}, that circulated in late medieval England. It argues that the phrase was often used to think about the efficacy of laypeople{\textquoteright}s prayer in a context where laypeople were increasingly able to access traditionally clerical knowledge. The article considers texts that identify the phrase as a {\textquoteleft}comoun prouerbe{\textquoteright}, texts that link it to the Paternoster, and texts that explain it with reference to academic discourse about atomism, before turning to Piers Plowman, where the phrase provokes some complex reflections on the way that different forms of knowledge might be internalized and articulated as devotion.",
author = "Alastair Bennett",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1484/J.NML.1.103189",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "127--163",
journal = "New Medieval Literatures",
issn = "1465-3737",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brevis oratio penetrat celum

T2 - Proverbs, Prayers and Lay Understanding in Late Medieval England

AU - Bennett, Alastair

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - This article explores the different interpretations of the phrase ‘Brevis oratio penetrat celum’, ‘A short prayer pierces heaven’, that circulated in late medieval England. It argues that the phrase was often used to think about the efficacy of laypeople’s prayer in a context where laypeople were increasingly able to access traditionally clerical knowledge. The article considers texts that identify the phrase as a ‘comoun prouerbe’, texts that link it to the Paternoster, and texts that explain it with reference to academic discourse about atomism, before turning to Piers Plowman, where the phrase provokes some complex reflections on the way that different forms of knowledge might be internalized and articulated as devotion.

AB - This article explores the different interpretations of the phrase ‘Brevis oratio penetrat celum’, ‘A short prayer pierces heaven’, that circulated in late medieval England. It argues that the phrase was often used to think about the efficacy of laypeople’s prayer in a context where laypeople were increasingly able to access traditionally clerical knowledge. The article considers texts that identify the phrase as a ‘comoun prouerbe’, texts that link it to the Paternoster, and texts that explain it with reference to academic discourse about atomism, before turning to Piers Plowman, where the phrase provokes some complex reflections on the way that different forms of knowledge might be internalized and articulated as devotion.

U2 - 10.1484/J.NML.1.103189

DO - 10.1484/J.NML.1.103189

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 127

EP - 163

JO - New Medieval Literatures

JF - New Medieval Literatures

SN - 1465-3737

ER -