Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners. / Sedikides, Constantine; Meek, Rosie; Alicke, Mark; Taylor, Sarah.

In: British Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 53, 2014, p. 396-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Published

Standard

Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners. / Sedikides, Constantine; Meek, Rosie; Alicke, Mark; Taylor, Sarah.

In: British Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 53, 2014, p. 396-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Sedikides, C, Meek, R, Alicke, M & Taylor, S 2014, 'Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners', British Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 53, pp. 396-403.

APA

Sedikides, C., Meek, R., Alicke, M., & Taylor, S. (2014). Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners. British Journal of Social Psychology, 53, 396-403.

Vancouver

Sedikides C, Meek R, Alicke M, Taylor S. Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners. British Journal of Social Psychology. 2014;53:396-403.

Author

Sedikides, Constantine ; Meek, Rosie ; Alicke, Mark ; Taylor, Sarah. / Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners. In: British Journal of Social Psychology. 2014 ; Vol. 53. pp. 396-403.

BibTeX

@article{8affb9509b824ae99efdfe74c7fa449a,
title = "Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners",
abstract = "That people evaluate themselves more favourably than their average peer on desirable characteristics—the better-than-average-effect, BTAE—is one of the most frequently-cited instances of motivated self-enhancement. It has been argued, however, that the BTAE can be rational when the distribution of characteristics is skewed such that most people lie above the mean. We addressed whether the BTAE is present even among people liable to be objectively below-average on such characteristics. Prisoners compared their standing on pro-social characteristics—such as kindness, morality, law-abidingness—to non-prisoners. Prisoners exhibited the BTAE on every characteristic except law-abidingness, for which they viewed themselves as average. Given that prisoners are unlikely to be objectively above-average on prosocial characteristics, the findings push for a motivational interpretation of the BTAE.",
author = "Constantine Sedikides and Rosie Meek and Mark Alicke and Sarah Taylor",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "396--403",
journal = "British Journal of Social Psychology",
issn = "0144-6665",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Behind bars but above the bar: prisoners consider themselves more prosocial than non-prisoners

AU - Sedikides, Constantine

AU - Meek, Rosie

AU - Alicke, Mark

AU - Taylor, Sarah

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - That people evaluate themselves more favourably than their average peer on desirable characteristics—the better-than-average-effect, BTAE—is one of the most frequently-cited instances of motivated self-enhancement. It has been argued, however, that the BTAE can be rational when the distribution of characteristics is skewed such that most people lie above the mean. We addressed whether the BTAE is present even among people liable to be objectively below-average on such characteristics. Prisoners compared their standing on pro-social characteristics—such as kindness, morality, law-abidingness—to non-prisoners. Prisoners exhibited the BTAE on every characteristic except law-abidingness, for which they viewed themselves as average. Given that prisoners are unlikely to be objectively above-average on prosocial characteristics, the findings push for a motivational interpretation of the BTAE.

AB - That people evaluate themselves more favourably than their average peer on desirable characteristics—the better-than-average-effect, BTAE—is one of the most frequently-cited instances of motivated self-enhancement. It has been argued, however, that the BTAE can be rational when the distribution of characteristics is skewed such that most people lie above the mean. We addressed whether the BTAE is present even among people liable to be objectively below-average on such characteristics. Prisoners compared their standing on pro-social characteristics—such as kindness, morality, law-abidingness—to non-prisoners. Prisoners exhibited the BTAE on every characteristic except law-abidingness, for which they viewed themselves as average. Given that prisoners are unlikely to be objectively above-average on prosocial characteristics, the findings push for a motivational interpretation of the BTAE.

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 396

EP - 403

JO - British Journal of Social Psychology

JF - British Journal of Social Psychology

SN - 0144-6665

ER -