Balancing Threat, Not Capabilities : European Defence Cooperation as Reformed Bandwagoning. / Dyson, Tom.

In: Contemporary Security Policy, Vol. 34, No. 2, 2013, p. 387-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Published

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Balancing Threat, Not Capabilities : European Defence Cooperation as Reformed Bandwagoning. / Dyson, Tom.

In: Contemporary Security Policy, Vol. 34, No. 2, 2013, p. 387-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Harvard

Dyson, T 2013, 'Balancing Threat, Not Capabilities: European Defence Cooperation as Reformed Bandwagoning', Contemporary Security Policy, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 387-91.

APA

Vancouver

Author

Dyson, Tom. / Balancing Threat, Not Capabilities : European Defence Cooperation as Reformed Bandwagoning. In: Contemporary Security Policy. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 387-91.

BibTeX

@article{e1b81e4ecd814b3db5c6d32616aa1f54,
title = "Balancing Threat, Not Capabilities: European Defence Cooperation as Reformed Bandwagoning",
abstract = "Cladi and Locatelli{\textquoteright}s conceptualisation of CSDP as an instance of bandwagoning on US power has significant analytical leverage; however, their analysis fails to outline an alternative systemic explanation to the balance of power. This contribution argues that European defence cooperation is best understood by using a Neoclassical Realist analysis that integrates the insights of Stephen Walt{\textquoteright}s {\textquoteleft}balance of threat{\textquoteright} theory. Furthermore, it is argued that the analysis presented by Pohl neglects the role of the Atlantic Alliance in European security. In doing so, Pohl misses the nature of CSDP as the central element of the {\textquoteleft}reform{\textquoteright} of Western Europe{\textquoteright}s Cold War bandwagoning on US power. One should not, therefore, expect CSDP operations to necessarily be about frustrating or helping US strategic objectives. CSDP is instead an institution that is designed primarily to meet security challenges within Europe{\textquoteright}s geopolitical neighbourhood that the US is unwilling or unable to tackle. ",
author = "Tom Dyson",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "387--91",
journal = "Contemporary Security Policy",
issn = "1352-3260",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Balancing Threat, Not Capabilities

T2 - European Defence Cooperation as Reformed Bandwagoning

AU - Dyson, Tom

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Cladi and Locatelli’s conceptualisation of CSDP as an instance of bandwagoning on US power has significant analytical leverage; however, their analysis fails to outline an alternative systemic explanation to the balance of power. This contribution argues that European defence cooperation is best understood by using a Neoclassical Realist analysis that integrates the insights of Stephen Walt’s ‘balance of threat’ theory. Furthermore, it is argued that the analysis presented by Pohl neglects the role of the Atlantic Alliance in European security. In doing so, Pohl misses the nature of CSDP as the central element of the ‘reform’ of Western Europe’s Cold War bandwagoning on US power. One should not, therefore, expect CSDP operations to necessarily be about frustrating or helping US strategic objectives. CSDP is instead an institution that is designed primarily to meet security challenges within Europe’s geopolitical neighbourhood that the US is unwilling or unable to tackle.

AB - Cladi and Locatelli’s conceptualisation of CSDP as an instance of bandwagoning on US power has significant analytical leverage; however, their analysis fails to outline an alternative systemic explanation to the balance of power. This contribution argues that European defence cooperation is best understood by using a Neoclassical Realist analysis that integrates the insights of Stephen Walt’s ‘balance of threat’ theory. Furthermore, it is argued that the analysis presented by Pohl neglects the role of the Atlantic Alliance in European security. In doing so, Pohl misses the nature of CSDP as the central element of the ‘reform’ of Western Europe’s Cold War bandwagoning on US power. One should not, therefore, expect CSDP operations to necessarily be about frustrating or helping US strategic objectives. CSDP is instead an institution that is designed primarily to meet security challenges within Europe’s geopolitical neighbourhood that the US is unwilling or unable to tackle.

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 34

SP - 387

EP - 391

JO - Contemporary Security Policy

JF - Contemporary Security Policy

SN - 1352-3260

IS - 2

ER -