Austerity Fashion 1945-1951 : Rebuilding fashion cultures in post-war London. / Bide, Bethan.

2017. 398 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Unpublished

Standard

Austerity Fashion 1945-1951 : Rebuilding fashion cultures in post-war London. / Bide, Bethan.

2017. 398 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Harvard

Bide, B 2017, 'Austerity Fashion 1945-1951: Rebuilding fashion cultures in post-war London', Ph.D., Royal Holloway, University of London.

APA

Vancouver

Author

BibTeX

@phdthesis{ff65738adb8d40fa98c525a747e9c608,
title = "Austerity Fashion 1945-1951: Rebuilding fashion cultures in post-war London",
abstract = "This thesis considers the relationship between fashion, austerity and London in theyears 1945 to 1951—categorised by popular history as a period of austerity inBritain. London in the late 1940s is commonly remembered as a drab city in a stateof disrepair, leading fashion historians to look instead to Paris and New York forsigns of post-war energy and change. Yet, looking closer at the business of makingand selling fashion in London, it becomes clear that, behind the shortages, rubbleand government regulation, something was stirring.The main empirical section of the thesis is divided into four chapters that exploredifferent facets of London’s fashionable networks. These consider how lookingclosely at the writing, making, selling and watching of austerity fashion can help usbuild a better understanding of London fashion in the late 1940s. Together, thesechapters reveal that austerity was a driving force for dynamic processes of change—particularly in relation to how women’s ready-to-wear fashions were made and soldin the city—and that a variety of social, economic and political conditions in postwarBritain changed the way manufacturers, retailers and consumers understoodthe symbolic capital of London fashion.Placing material culture at the centre of this story and taking a ‘more-than-representational’ approach to research creates new historical perspectives andexposes the processes and networks concealed within the social and genderhierarchies of London fashion at this time. It redraws the map of the fashion city,making connections between the city-centre and suburb, West End stores and EastEnd workrooms, and national government policies and local business strategies. Inmapping these connections, the thesis reveals how this period of austerity, andLondoners’ responses to it, formed the mould that would shape London’s trajectoryas a fashion city for the rest of the twentieth century.",
keywords = "fashion, London, austerity, 1940s, fashion cities, museum, material culture, shopping, film, garment industry",
author = "Bethan Bide",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
school = "Royal Holloway, University of London",

}

RIS

TY - THES

T1 - Austerity Fashion 1945-1951

T2 - Rebuilding fashion cultures in post-war London

AU - Bide, Bethan

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This thesis considers the relationship between fashion, austerity and London in theyears 1945 to 1951—categorised by popular history as a period of austerity inBritain. London in the late 1940s is commonly remembered as a drab city in a stateof disrepair, leading fashion historians to look instead to Paris and New York forsigns of post-war energy and change. Yet, looking closer at the business of makingand selling fashion in London, it becomes clear that, behind the shortages, rubbleand government regulation, something was stirring.The main empirical section of the thesis is divided into four chapters that exploredifferent facets of London’s fashionable networks. These consider how lookingclosely at the writing, making, selling and watching of austerity fashion can help usbuild a better understanding of London fashion in the late 1940s. Together, thesechapters reveal that austerity was a driving force for dynamic processes of change—particularly in relation to how women’s ready-to-wear fashions were made and soldin the city—and that a variety of social, economic and political conditions in postwarBritain changed the way manufacturers, retailers and consumers understoodthe symbolic capital of London fashion.Placing material culture at the centre of this story and taking a ‘more-than-representational’ approach to research creates new historical perspectives andexposes the processes and networks concealed within the social and genderhierarchies of London fashion at this time. It redraws the map of the fashion city,making connections between the city-centre and suburb, West End stores and EastEnd workrooms, and national government policies and local business strategies. Inmapping these connections, the thesis reveals how this period of austerity, andLondoners’ responses to it, formed the mould that would shape London’s trajectoryas a fashion city for the rest of the twentieth century.

AB - This thesis considers the relationship between fashion, austerity and London in theyears 1945 to 1951—categorised by popular history as a period of austerity inBritain. London in the late 1940s is commonly remembered as a drab city in a stateof disrepair, leading fashion historians to look instead to Paris and New York forsigns of post-war energy and change. Yet, looking closer at the business of makingand selling fashion in London, it becomes clear that, behind the shortages, rubbleand government regulation, something was stirring.The main empirical section of the thesis is divided into four chapters that exploredifferent facets of London’s fashionable networks. These consider how lookingclosely at the writing, making, selling and watching of austerity fashion can help usbuild a better understanding of London fashion in the late 1940s. Together, thesechapters reveal that austerity was a driving force for dynamic processes of change—particularly in relation to how women’s ready-to-wear fashions were made and soldin the city—and that a variety of social, economic and political conditions in postwarBritain changed the way manufacturers, retailers and consumers understoodthe symbolic capital of London fashion.Placing material culture at the centre of this story and taking a ‘more-than-representational’ approach to research creates new historical perspectives andexposes the processes and networks concealed within the social and genderhierarchies of London fashion at this time. It redraws the map of the fashion city,making connections between the city-centre and suburb, West End stores and EastEnd workrooms, and national government policies and local business strategies. Inmapping these connections, the thesis reveals how this period of austerity, andLondoners’ responses to it, formed the mould that would shape London’s trajectoryas a fashion city for the rest of the twentieth century.

KW - fashion

KW - London

KW - austerity

KW - 1940s

KW - fashion cities

KW - museum

KW - material culture

KW - shopping

KW - film

KW - garment industry

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -