A Case Study of Witness Consistency and Memory Recovery Across Multiple Investigative Interviews. / Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E; la Rooy, David; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 18.01.2012, p. 118-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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A Case Study of Witness Consistency and Memory Recovery Across Multiple Investigative Interviews. / Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E; la Rooy, David; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 18.01.2012, p. 118-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Orbach, Y, Lamb, ME, la Rooy, D & Pipe, M-E 2012, 'A Case Study of Witness Consistency and Memory Recovery Across Multiple Investigative Interviews', Applied Cognitive Psychology, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 118-129. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.1803

APA

Orbach, Y., Lamb, M. E., la Rooy, D., & Pipe, M-E. (2012). A Case Study of Witness Consistency and Memory Recovery Across Multiple Investigative Interviews. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 26(1), 118-129. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.1803

Vancouver

Author

Orbach, Yael ; Lamb, Michael E ; la Rooy, David ; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen. / A Case Study of Witness Consistency and Memory Recovery Across Multiple Investigative Interviews. In: Applied Cognitive Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 118-129.

BibTeX

@article{aa5b4ab8be894d7ebd30957500999029,
title = "A Case Study of Witness Consistency and Memory Recovery Across Multiple Investigative Interviews",
abstract = "Access to audio recordings of 5 interviews (Interviews 2-6), and to the interviewer{\textquoteright}s contemporaneous notes during an initial unrecorded interview, made it possible to assess consistency across repeated attempts by a 9-year-old to describe her older sister{\textquoteright}s abduction from their shared bedroom. Information provided in each of the interviews was systematically analysed to determine whether each unit of information was new, consistent (repeated), or contradictory in relation to earlier reported information, and whether any informative detail provided in the witness{\textquoteright} initial interview was subsequently omitted. In addition, the witness{\textquoteright} accounts were compared with details provided by the victim upon her rescue. This case analysis is particularly informative in light of widespread professional concerns about the effects of repeated interviewing on the quality and accuracy of children{\textquoteright}s accounts of experienced events. ",
keywords = "repeated interviews",
author = "Yael Orbach and Lamb, {Michael E} and {la Rooy}, David and Margaret-Ellen Pipe",
year = "2012",
month = jan,
day = "18",
doi = "10.1002/acp.1803",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "118--129",
journal = "Applied Cognitive Psychology",
issn = "0888-4080",
publisher = "JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Case Study of Witness Consistency and Memory Recovery Across Multiple Investigative Interviews

AU - Orbach, Yael

AU - Lamb, Michael E

AU - la Rooy, David

AU - Pipe, Margaret-Ellen

PY - 2012/1/18

Y1 - 2012/1/18

N2 - Access to audio recordings of 5 interviews (Interviews 2-6), and to the interviewer’s contemporaneous notes during an initial unrecorded interview, made it possible to assess consistency across repeated attempts by a 9-year-old to describe her older sister’s abduction from their shared bedroom. Information provided in each of the interviews was systematically analysed to determine whether each unit of information was new, consistent (repeated), or contradictory in relation to earlier reported information, and whether any informative detail provided in the witness’ initial interview was subsequently omitted. In addition, the witness’ accounts were compared with details provided by the victim upon her rescue. This case analysis is particularly informative in light of widespread professional concerns about the effects of repeated interviewing on the quality and accuracy of children’s accounts of experienced events.

AB - Access to audio recordings of 5 interviews (Interviews 2-6), and to the interviewer’s contemporaneous notes during an initial unrecorded interview, made it possible to assess consistency across repeated attempts by a 9-year-old to describe her older sister’s abduction from their shared bedroom. Information provided in each of the interviews was systematically analysed to determine whether each unit of information was new, consistent (repeated), or contradictory in relation to earlier reported information, and whether any informative detail provided in the witness’ initial interview was subsequently omitted. In addition, the witness’ accounts were compared with details provided by the victim upon her rescue. This case analysis is particularly informative in light of widespread professional concerns about the effects of repeated interviewing on the quality and accuracy of children’s accounts of experienced events.

KW - repeated interviews

U2 - 10.1002/acp.1803

DO - 10.1002/acp.1803

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 118

EP - 129

JO - Applied Cognitive Psychology

JF - Applied Cognitive Psychology

SN - 0888-4080

IS - 1

ER -