Ms Nina-Marie Gardner

Supervised by

Personal profile

My research focuses on the challenges of adapting the work of the modernist women writers to the stage, examining the points where modernism, feminism and adaptation intersect, and drawing upon my own work adapting the prose fiction of American modernist Margery Latimer. The viability of domestic realism as the dominant paradigm in contemporary American theatre formed the basis of my research at Masters level (M.A. Playwriting, Royal Holloway). I received a Royal Holloway International Excellence Scholarship for my Masters studies, and my Postgraduate research is funded by a Crossland Research Scholarship. My research at undergraduate level (B.A. English, Yale University) focused on the images of female sexuality in Shakespeare’s King Lear. I also hold an M.A in Creative Writing (Royal Holloway).

My short stories, essays and reviews have been published in 3AM Magazine, The Fix, The Frisky, Flavorpill and the anthologies Bedford Square and 3AM London, New York, Paris. My debut novel Sherry & Narcotics was published in May 2011 by Future Fiction London, and my second novel, I’m Not This Girl was published in 2012. My stage adaptation of Sherry & Narcotics was a finalist for the 2013 Verity Bargate Award and was staged as part of the Arcola Theatre’s PlayWROUGHT Festival. The Land, my first original full-length play, was selected for the Omnibus Clapham’s Read/Write/Perform Festival.

www.ninamariegardner.com

Teaching

Academic Year 2017/18 Visiting Lecturer

 

Theatre & the Text, Autumn & Spring Terms

This module is designed to equip students with critical and creative skills for engaging with theatrical texts of various kinds. The multiple relationships between page and stage are considered, looking at the evolution and diversity of the performance text, as well as various methods and principles developed to generate performance texts across a broad historical, cultural and stylistic range. The wide variety of choices available to all theatre makers are explored – actors, directors, performers, designers, and more – in working on staging performance texts, asking questions about how meaning is produced on the page and in performance, the possibilities and limits of interpretation, and the dynamics of working with text. The course also considers how performance can generate text: considering, for example, the archive of performance (in reviews and other documents), and the different methods that students and others can use – and have used – to engage with performance, critically and creatively.

 

Theatre & Ideas, Spring Term

The Idea of Adaptation

In this module students are introduced to adaptation theory and given the opportunity to explore its application in terms of dramaturgy and contemporary theatre practice. Students are encouraged to shape their own critical analyses, drawing upon a wide variety of performances and considering them within a theoretical, historical and cultural context. Questions the course asks students to interrogate include: How important is the issue of fidelity in re-telling a story? What constitutes an original text? Are all plays really a form of adaptation? Or are all adaptations original in the way they choose to re-tell a story?

 

The Idea of Gender & Sexuality

This module considers the ways in which performance engages with, reveals, challenges, deconstructs and resists dominant norms of gender and sexuality, with a focus on how performances influence and reflect shifts in discourses of power. Students are introduced to a range of plays, practitioners and performance artists to interrogate notions of the 'other' as performances of gender and sexual identities. In addition to exploring theoretical frameworks of gender and sexuality, this module looks at intersections with other elements of performance of identity such as social class and ethnicity. 

 

Academic Year 2015/16 Visiting Lecturer Culture & Creativity, Autumn term - Contemporary Adaptation

In this module students are introduced to adaptation theory and given the opportunity to explore its application in terms of dramaturgy and contemporary theatre practice. Students are encouraged to shape their own critical analyses, drawing upon a wide variety of performances and considering them within a theoretical, historical and cultural context. Questions the course asks students to interrogate include: How important is the issue of fidelity in re-telling a story? What constitutes an original text? Are all plays really a form of adaptation? Or are all adaptations original in the way they choose to re-tell a story?

 

Academic Year 2014/15 Visiting Lecturer, Culture & Creativity, Autumn and Spring terms.

This course offers students a further level of engagement with theatre and arts practice, in a way that is designed to help them focus on life beyond the degree. In the first term, the focus is on contemporary cultural production in the UK and beyond. In the second term, students look at the state of play in a range of contemporary performance forms, well as engaging as theatre critics with a range of theatre and performance events, and considering the state of criticism and opportunities available through blogging, social media and more.

 

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