Dr George Vassiadis

Personal profile

 

Background

My academic interest in Greek social, political and cultural history started with a BA in Classical and Hellenic Studies at McGill University in Montreal. I then moved to King’s College London, where I undertook an MA in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies and a PhD in Modern Greek History. My doctoral thesis focussed on Greek schools and educational societies in the Ottoman Empire. After completing my postgraduate studies, I was Goltsos Visiting Instructor in History at Brown University and a Visiting Research Associate in the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies at King’s College London.

Research & Teaching

I am fascinated by the way in which individuals and kinship groups have influenced Greek history. For many years I have been actively documenting family, entrepreneurial and intellectual networks in Greece and the Greek Diaspora from the 18th to the 20th centuries, using a variety of different sources and concentrating on several linchpin families whose connections linked Europe, Asia, Africa and North America.  I am currently in the early stages of working on a study of the Greek presence in the United Kingdom from 1840 to the outbreak of World War II.

I am also interested in the social makeup and cultural development of the flourishing Greek communities in the Ottoman Empire from the 18th century onwards. Recording the modern history of the Greek, Jewish, Armenian and European communities in cities like Istanbul, Izmir, Alexandria, and Cairo is essential to preserving the memories and physical remains of the cosmopolitan world they helped create along the eastern and southern fringes of the Mediterranean Sea.

My research and teaching also touches upon Anglo-Hellenic relations in the widest possible sense, the involvement of the European Powers in the creation and expansion of the independent Greek state, the Wittelsbach and Glücksburg dynasties and their courts, the influence of the European Powers in the Late Ottoman Empire, and the mechanisms and aftermath of the 1923 exchange of Greek and Turkish populations.

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